Archive for thomas sowell

White People Deserve Reparations

Posted in uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on July 25, 2021 by andelino
Galley Slaves of the Barbary Corsairs (colored litho); colored lithograph; Private Collection; Peter Newark Historical Pictures; out of copyright

The idea that the descendants of slaves are owed reparations is based on the notion that white people owe black people money today because dead white people mistreated dead black people long ago. On this score alone, this is a racist proposal, the victims of whom are white.

Why should those who did not suffer the indignity of slavery be awarded financial compensation? And why should those who had nothing to do with it be forced to pony up? But if this crazed idea is to be taken seriously, then white people are also deserving of reparations. Who should pay? Muslims.

Economist Thomas Sowell recalls that it was Adam Smith, author of “The Wealth of Nations,” who observed in 1776 that Western Europe was the only place in the world where slavery did not exist. Sowell further notes that nowhere in the world was slavery a controversial issue prior to the 18th century. It wasn’t controversial in Africa or Asia or the Middle East—they were accustomed to slavery. No, it was in Western Europe and the newly created United States where objections were first registered.

It seems odd, then, that the nations which ended slavery are the ones being tapped for reparations. Yet that is exactly what the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, Michelle Bachelet, wants. She recently said that those nations that “engaged in or profited from enslavement, the transatlantic trade in enslaved Africans, and colonialism—as well as those who continue to profit from this legacy,” should pay reparations.

Bachelet, like so many other elites around the world, never addresses the need for reparations to white people. They need to do so.

Charles Sumner was an 18th century American politician, and one of America’s most famous abolitionists. He not only condemned black slavery, he condemned white slavery. Indeed, he wrote a book about it, “White Slavery in the Barbary States,” published in 1853.

Sumner detailed how Muslim pirates from North Africa, called corsairs, “became the scourge of Christendom, while their much-dreaded system of slavery assumed a front of new terrors. Their ravages were not confined to the Mediterranean.” In fact, they extended to “the chalky cliffs of England, and even from the distant western coasts of Ireland,” forcing the inhabitants into “cruel captivity.”

The most authoritative work on this subject can be found in Robert Davis’ book, “Christian Slaves, Muslim Masters: White Slavery in the Mediterranean, the Barbary Coast, and Italy, 1500-1800.” The Ohio State University professor of history estimates that “between 1530 and 1780 there was almost certainly 1 million and quite possibly as many as 1.25 million white, European Christians enslaved by the Muslims of the Barbary Coast.”

How did the Muslim slave masters manage to capture these white people? The Barbary pirates trolled the Mediterranean looking for ships to raid, taking their cargo and enslaving those on board. They also showed up at coastal towns of Italy, Spain, France, England, Ireland, and the Netherlands.

“While the Barbary corsairs looted the cargo of ships they captured,” writes Davis, “their primary goal was to capture non-Muslim people for sale as slaves or for ransom.” Meaning that the pirates were out to enslave white people. It should be noted that they treated their slaves just as harshly as white slave masters in America treated their slaves. “As far as daily living conditions,” he says, “the Mediterranean slaves certainly didn’t have it any better.”

According to political scientist Abraham H. Miller, “For over two hundred years, during the mid-1600s to the 1830s, Barbary Muslims trafficked in white people. The Ottoman Muslims trafficked in white people slavery started even earlier, in the 15th century. All in all, Muslims enslaved more than two million white people.”

Similarly, Sowell contends that the number of whites who were enslaved in North Africa by the Barbary pirates “exceeded the number of Africans enslaved in the United States and in the American colonies put together.” In fact, he adds, “white slaves were being brought and sold in the Ottoman Empire decades after blacks were freed in the United States.”

This raises an interesting question: Are white people today owed reparations?

Sowell knows the answer. “Nobody is going to North Africa for reparations, because nobody is going to be fool enough to give it to them.” “So,” Miller asks, “should white people condemn all Muslims for their role in the enslavement of white people? Should the white people of the Southern Mediterranean demand reparations from Muslims for the enslavement of their ancestors?”

I would go further: “Should present-day Muslims living in America be forced to pay reparations to white people living here today?” According to the logic of those who work in the reparations industry—you don’t have to be personally guilty or personally victimized to qualify—the answer is clearly yes.

Perhaps the U.N.’s chief Human Rights official can offer some advice. But to do so she would first have to admit that her selective interest in this subject makes her racist ideas unsuitable to continue. She should resign.

Contact this racist at: mbachelet@ohchr.org

Common Sense/Senseless World

Posted in uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on February 25, 2021 by andelino

Thomas Sowell is often called “the smartest person in the room” by those who know him. A newly released documentary explores how he earned that honor, and why he is considered by many as one of the greatest intellectuals of modern American conservatism.

“Thomas Sowell: Common Sense in a Senseless World” debuted recently. The one-hour film by Free to Choose Media is available to view for free on YouTube and Vimeo, as well as on Amazon Prime.

It traces Sowell’s life, starting from his humble beginnings in North Carolina and his coming of age in Harlem. It then follows his footsteps as he made his way as a student and then educator at such campuses as the University of Chicago, Harvard, Columbia, Cornell and UCLA.

The film tackles his evolution as a Marxist to a limited-government and free market economist.

It also delves into his passion for school choice, his talents as an amateur photographer, his interest in late-talking children, and how his world travels shaped his scholarly work.

It’s narrated by The Wall Street Journal’s Jason Riley, who described Sowell as an honest intellectual who spent his career “putting truth above popularity” and following “facts where they lead.”

Sowell, when asked why he “abandoned” Marxism, was able to answer that question in a word: “facts.” But he also mentioned a brief stint working inside the federal government made him realize it holds no true solutions.

The documentary peppers in interviews by some of Sowell’s intellectual peers, such as Walter Williams, Larry Elder, Steven Pinker and Victor Davis Hanson, who described their friend as someone who fearlessly and relentlessly sought the truth through intellectual honesty, asking the right questions, and following facts to their logical conclusion.

The film notes, for example, that it was his time teaching at Cornell in the 1960s that led him to witness and learn firsthand about the mismatch concept, in which black students who do very well at other schools are recruited in name of affirmative action to schools where they are in over their heads, creating “animosity, angst, division, and academic failure.”

The documentary also tackled Sowell’s take on the “welfare state”, which he sees as something that disincentivizes success, especially for and within the black community.

As the film tracks Sowell’s life, his prolific writing career and his published works as a scholar at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, it drops in some of his poignant quotes, such as: “If you have always believed that everyone should play by the same rules and be judged by the same standards, that would have gotten you labeled a radical 50 years ago, a liberal 25 years ago and a racist today.”

Today, at age 90, Sowell’s thoughts on “economics, history, race and politics” have not only already influenced countless Americans throughout the decades, but are sure to stand the “test of time” and serve as a lasting conservative legacy in the generations to come.

Marxist-turned-free-market economist Thomas Sowell writes his final syndicated column
The man who should have been our first Black president

Documentary Uncle Tom

Posted in uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 29, 2020 by andelino

It is both a “dismal” reflection and “depressing” statement of the times in which we live that a film like “Uncle Tom” is considered “controversial” and worthy of “media” censorship.

For daring to reject the prevailing “narrative” of black victim hood and instead choosing to “empower” the black community through individual actions, it has already been largely ignored by “conventional” media outlets.

To no one’s surprise, and to the film’s point, “black conservative” opinions do not matter. Hence a review three weeks in the making; if this film inexplicably “escaped” your radar, time to put it back on there. Sometimes second waves can be good.

Released on Juneteenth, “Uncle Tom” offers an alternative view, one of “uplift and optimism”, that run counter to the “depressing and damaging” narrative of black oppression by white America.

A statement by Herman Cain at the onset of the film captures the essence of the “divide” besetting our nation and the basis of the culture war in which we presently find ourselves mired. Cain states his three guiding lights are a “belief in God, belief in myself, and belief in the United States of America.” 

It dawned on me how little we hear phrases like this anymore.

Each of these beliefs is “anathema” to the current platform of the Democrats and the left. They say belief in God is “delusional”, they say belief in oneself is Eurocentric and rooted in “whiteness” (this is not a joke, Robin DiAngelo says the concept of individualism is pablum from Western Civilization), and they say belief in the United States is – get ready for it – “racist, sexist, intolerant, patriarchal, cisgender normative, therefore transphobic, heteronormative, therefore homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic and based in white supremacy and colonization.”

Someone, somewhere, has probably added to the list in the last five minutes.

Cain was speaking only for himself, but it is safe to suggest that not only are each of the film’s participants guided by a similar set of values but that conservatives as a whole are.

Here is Herman Cain, someone who grew up “poor and black” in the American South, and later became a decorated Naval officer, a computer science whiz, corporate executive, Federal Reserve branch chairman, and presidential candidate, and I find myself having more in common with him as a younger white male with a completely different childhood and professional background than I do most of my own siblings or cousins.

Why? Because we share the same values.

In the leftists’ perfect world, and as an example of their unifying themes and tolerance, I would owe Herman Cain reparations because I’m white and he would be expected to loathe me for ancient evils because he’s black. Does that make our country stronger?

The film opens with each interviewee running down a litany of “hateful” terms they have been called by fellow blacks as a result of simply rejecting the narrative of “victim hood.” For daring to step away from the expected party line, they are “demeaned and silenced.”

Each strong enough to withstand the hate, it is the silence that is most frustrating; how is it that thinkers like Walter Williams, Thomas Sowell, and Clarence Thomas are unknowns in the black community?

The election of Barack Obama was certainly a pinnacle achievement for the black community and provided inspiration outside the realms of hip-hop and sports, but there are others in the public sphere who could have been serving generations of young blacks as equally inspirational role models.

The film also delves into the various political and entrepreneurial success stories of black Americans, young and old. Executive producer Larry Elder and director Justin Malone assemble a group of people that, at any other time, would be exemplars of success and worthy of emulation for everyone.

The aforementioned Herman Cain, Colonel Allen West, Carol Swain, and Larry Elder himself appear alongside a younger generation of prominent black voices like Brandon Tatum and Candace Owens, among others, in a powerful showcasing of what “confidence, competence, and perseverance” can deliver. They neither wanted favor nor got it. They simply wanted the system and naysayers to get out of the way so they could go achieve.

Carol Swain, a prominent historian, and professor is introduced to us by saying “I never saw myself as handicapped because I was a black, because I was a woman, that I came from poverty…” Likewise, an early glimpse of Larry Elder shows him telling us that “I always knew I was going to be an achiever…I never thought of myself as a victim.”

Herman Cain relates the time a college student asked him “How did you deal with color and race when you were climbing the corporate ladder?” He laughs, then continues with his reply, “I didn’t – let them do it.”

Consistent across the interviews is a simple realization: “Not one person in the bunch sees themselves as a victim, and not surprisingly, each person is successful in their own way, in career, family, disposition. Each individual speaker is proud of who they are and their heritage.”

Indeed, the subjects of the film could not be more satisfied and content with their own outcomes in life, the result of “hard work, determination, and self-reliance.” They have applied themselves and as a result, each of them has lived the American Dream.

But, in order to do so, they, like anyone else, have to see themselves as Americans first. Not black and definitely not victims; but Americans.

The story of Jesse Lee Peterson is a great example of a political awakening. As a young, angry black man who accepted the myth that blacks could not achieve, he nonetheless observed the likes of Jesse Jackson profit handsomely off “race hustling.” If Jesse Jackson could beat the system and enrich himself, why couldn’t other blacks?

In a flash, the narrative wisped away. Colin Kaepernick makes an appearance as a modern-day example of someone simultaneously “decrying” the American system and generating enormous “sums of money” for himself for doing it.

What the film is not, and this is most important, is a plea for black Americans to just change their “voting” habits on a whim. Insofar as that is the current modus operandi, pulling a lever uncritically is the entire complaint of the production team.

Right now, they ask why 95% of blacks are “dependable” Democrats; simply switching over to the other side in equal numbers “ignores” the larger problem, namely seeking out “solutions” that are best for the community.

In many ways, in fact, a just-as-common complaint among many of the film’s subjects is that they are equally “abandoned” by the conservative right. Carol Swain found out firsthand that the Republican establishment didn’t seem overly concerned with “winning” black votes in her native Nashville during a mayoral run, and Colonel Allen West observes that Republicans have largely “written off” the black vote, having accepted it is a monolithic bloc.

Still, one cannot help but notice the appeal to the Republican Party. After all, there are staggering revelations about the percentage of “Planned Parenthood” operating in black communities (75%) and the resultant sheer loss of black life via “abortion” (20 million since Roe v. Wade; 52% of all black pregnancies ending in abortion).

There is then the incompatibility between Democrats supporting unchecked “illegal” immigration that imposes a burden not only on the low-wage job market but the welfare state, too. Both disproportionately impact the black community. School choice could be added to the list.

At the same time, the narrative about black “oppression” could be countered if the media celebrated aspects going well.

As Larry Elder observes, “if black America were a country, it’d be the 15th wealthiest country in the world.” Candace Owens remarks, in a Congressional hearing, that “white supremacy” would not crack a list on things the black community needs to worry about; yet, what is the narrative in the media and culture?

The dialogues are intended to be eye-opening for the black community, but this film is so powerful because it can resonate with anybody. Yes, it is a movie with only black voices, and the black voices speak directly to an intended black audience, but their messages transcend race.

That is the beauty of the conservative message. We look beyond superficial traits like skin color and focus on values. This film speaks about a specific value system – seeing oneself as in control of a personal narrative, working through challenges and coming out stronger, accepting America as a terrific country of opportunity, and being rewarded for hard work.

Every single American would become a better person having adopted such values, and the country would become better for it as well.

This film needs to be seen by everyone. Share the message!

“Uncle Tom” Will Frighten the American Left
“Uncle Tom” Is More Destructive Than the “N-word”

Diversity is Our Strength II

Posted in uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on April 25, 2020 by andelino

Western leaders, especially Justin Trudeau, Angela Merkel, Emmanuel Macron, and many others on the Left love to use this expression, most often in reference to their large and ever-growing Muslim immigrant populations.

“Many western nations have assumed that increasing ethnic and cultural diversity through immigration would be beneficial. The dogma of diversity, tolerance and inclusion assumed that all members of the society wanted to be included as equal citizens. Yet, instead of diversity being a blessing, many have found that they’ve ended up with a lot of arrogant people living in their countries with no intention of letting go of their previous cultures, animosities, preferences, and pretensions.”  Don Conklin

“When in Rome do as the Romans do” was once a common saying. Today, after generations in the West have been indoctrinated with the rhetoric of multiculturalism, the borders of Western nations on both sides of the Atlantic have been thrown open to people who think it is their prerogative to come as refugees and tell the Romans what to do — and to assault those who don’t knuckle under to foreign religious standards. It has not been our diversity, but our ability to overcome the problems inherent in diversity, and to act together as Americans, that has been our strength.” — Thomas Sowell

“Look, I’m mayor of the greatest city in the world, and one of our strengths is our diversity,” he told reporters shortly after the attack by Usman Khan, a convicted “radical Islamic terrorist” who had been freed from prison on a tag after serving less than half of a 16-year term, which left two dead and three injured.

“But we do know there are people out there who hate out diversity, hate what we stand for, and are trying to seek to divide us”, he added — although his grounds for appearing to suggest that terrorists despise Britain for being diverse were unclear.

Mayor Khan then flirted with controversy with a statement echoing an earlier, infamous former claim of his with respect to terror attacks — i.e. that “part and parcel of living in a great global city is you’ve got to be prepared for these things” — by telling reporters: “Look, I know, speaking to colleagues around the world, mayors of other great cities, that we’re all targets for terrorists.”

%d bloggers like this: