Hot Old Ladies

Hot Old Ladies 00

We can all agree that it’s a great “feat” to live to be 100 and an even greater feat if you live “well past it.”

Believe it or not, the “five” oldest people in the world today were all born in the 1800s! These super “centenarians,” have lived through “world wars, the sinking of the Titanic, the space race” and much more.

But what’s even more “astounding” is that when they were born, the “life expectancy” for people in the U.S. was just around 60.

The oldest among them, Misao Okawa of Japan, has nearly “doubled” that as she “headed” toward her 117th birthday last March.

Here are the five oldest hot ladies in the world and their candid tips for living a long life:

World's Oldest Woman Turns 115

1. Misao Okawa, 116, Japan

Okawa was born in Osaka, Japan in 1898 and became the oldest person in the world when another Japanese centenarian, Jiroemon Kimura, passed away in 2013. Okawa lives in a retirement community and eats three square meals a day. She especially likes sushi which she makes sure to have at least once a month. But more important than diet are these three key tenets: “Eat and sleep and you will live a long time,” she told The Telegraph on her 116th birthday. “You have to learn to relax.” She also is said to sleep eight hours every night. Good, sound advice we think.

Hot Old Ladies 02

2. Gertrude Weaver, 116, Arkansas

Weaver was America’s oldest living person and celebrates her birthday on the 4th of July. Weaver was born in 1898. She lived in a care facility relatively active. She said it’s her faith that kept her going. “You have to follow God. Don’t follow anyone else,” she told the Camden News on her 116th birthday. “Be obedient and follow the laws and don’t worry about anything. I’ve followed him for many, many years and I ain’t tired.”

Just days after becoming the world’s oldest documented person, 116-year-old Gertrude Weaver died April 6, 2015 in Arkansas. Weaver became the oldest person in the world after the death of 117-year-old Japanese Misao Okawa according to records kept by the Los Angeles based “Gerontology Research Group.”

Hot Old Ladies 03

3. Jeralean Talley, 115, Michigan

Talley grew up in the South and was married for 52 years, until her husband passed away. She lives with her daughter and enjoys playing with her great-great-grandkids and even takes an annual fishing trip! Talley’s advice for a long life is perfectly simple: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you, that’s my way of living,” she told a Michigan news affiliate in 2013.

Miss Susie turns 113

4. Susannah Mushatt Jones, 115, New York

At 115, Mushatt Jones is as “feisty” as ever. She loves bacon, scrambled eggs and grits every day for breakfast — not exactly something that is a recipe for long life, you’d think. But except for vision loss due to glaucoma, the only health problem she is medicated for is blood pressure. She’s also said to have an affinity for lacy lingerie. “You can never get too old to wear fancy stuff,” she’s said, according to TIME. You go, girl.

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5. Emma Morano-Martinuzzi, 115, Italy

Morano-Martinuzzi was born just days before the turn of the century in November 1899. It’s her slightly unusual diet which she credits for her longevity. When she was just 20, Morano-Martinuzzi says that a doctor told her to have one raw and one cooked egg daily, which she does to this day. She also keeps dinner light, having just a glass of milk, she told an Italian newspaper, La Stampa. Or maybe it’s getting enough sleep that’s doing the trick. She follows the old adage of early to bed, early to rise. She goes to bed at around 7 p.m. and wakes up just before 6 a.m.
Incredible.

Secrets To Longevity

Life Extender: No Worries
“Part of living to 100 seems to require having the right personality,” Dr. Perls says. “It appears that centenarians manage their stress, rather than letting it manage them. They don’t internalize stress, which has been linked to heart disease and high blood pressure, cancer and Alzheimer’s. Of the centenarians we have tested, many scored low in neuroticism, meaning that they tend not to dwell on things.”

Life Extender: Veggie Diet
According to a recent study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, diets that incorporate fats and proteins from vegetables instead of meat may help to lower the risk of heart disease.

Life Extender: Pearly Whites
Well-flossed teeth may mean a longer life. Studies by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control found a link between dental problems, such as chronic inflammation of the gums and gingivitis, and heart disease.

Life Extender: Genetics
Not much you can do about this, but Dr. Perls’s research has found that those who have a relative who made it past 100 are more likely to pass the century mark as well. “Longevity runs strongly in families,” he says. “If you’re generally healthy, you’ll live to about 88 years, and to go those additional 12, you’ll probably need at least one family member who has reached the 90s.”

Life Enders: Smoking
“If you smoke, you may automatically take 15 years off your life,” Dr. Perls says. “Few centenarians smoke, and even exposure to secondhand smoke is a concern.” However, according to research published in the American Journal of Public Health, if you were a smoker but quit, you’ll likely outlive those who continue to puff away.

Life Enders: Isolation
“Being close to family members appears to provide an important social safety net,” Dr. Perls says. “Centenarians tend to be gregarious and funny. Rarely do they come across as grumpy loners.”

Life Enders: Spare Tires
“Obesity is quite rare among centenarians, especially in men,” Dr. Perls says. “Many believe in moderation in many aspects of their lives.”

Life Enders: Sleepless Nights
Are you snoozing fewer than six hours a night? If so, you’re risking membership in the 100 Club. Studies have linked heart disease to a lack of shut-eye — particularly with fewer than those six hours.

Aging is something “unpredictable.” I hope these ladies had the “time of their life” in their longevity journey.

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